Quote of the Day

The success of The Windup Girl makes me wonder whether or not we even know what the term ‘science fiction’ means to people. I hope my novel uses the same tools science fiction has always used, but turns them to some pressing, timely concerns of today. Maybe science fiction lost its track a little bit, and got off on some lines of speculation which are pretty interesting but not necessarily connected to today’s questions, as previously it had been core to our conception of ourselves and where we were headed. You want our genre to be perceived as the most relevant of storytelling methods. That science fiction is specifically about our world and what’s going on with it, imposing a sense of meaning over that world that otherwise is muddy.

- Paolo Bacigalupi, author of the excellent The Windup Girl (Canada, USA, Europe) in an interview with Locus Magazine.

6 commentaires:

Anonymous said...

Exactly what is science fiction is quite an old debate, as I'm sure you, and Paolo, are aware. I love stuff that pushes at the boundaries and borders of genres. One of the best examples that comes to mind is Anne McCaffrey's "Dragonriders of Pern" series that seamlessly blends traditional fantasy with technology.

I've actually just finished reading "Transition" by Iain Banks. I've read pretty much everything he's published as Iain M Banks, but this is the first book I've read that he's published as Iain Banks. I was not disappointed!

Moving away from the big names, I've also thoroughly enjoyed A Shadow Falls by David Shepherd, an up and coming indie author. If you like a bit of sword and sorcery I'd recommend you give it a go!

Zafri Mollon said...

Really enjoyed this novel! Wonderful speculation on what the world could conceivably come to in the future if we take a particular path.

Matthew MacNish said...

I haven't read this one yet, but his YA novel, Ship Breaker, was absolutely phenomenal. I really need to get my hands on The Windup Girl.

Kevin said...

I was rather disappointed with the Windup Girl. Yes, it is competently written. Yes, there are some great ideas and considerations in the book.
The problem, for me, was that at no time did I feel emotionally invested in the story. The whole thing just didn't click with me, and it was rather a slug to get through the book.

allanbard said...

Interesting debate! I guess the reason for this could be the lack of new blood in the genre? I haven't read the book yet, though I plan to, yet it's well-known most of the books in the genre deal with ordinary, too common aready characters... like little green men, human-like aliens, monsters that look like the common beasts in the fairy-tales, etc. There should be fresh, new characters, creatures in the stories, so that the genre could become more serious, more intriguing, etc? I strive for that in some of my books, though I haven't written sci-fi yet but have some future projects. I guess new characters like: weightless korks, glowing, living balls, night fruit, fish-keepers, Brown faces, Fiery men, etc are a good addition to the genre?

whosyourchaddy said...

I read this one and found it to be really dull. The premise seemed really cool and some of the stuff was so creative but the driving force of the plot left something to be desired. Much like a China Mieville novel. Some of the coolest creations but the stories just don't entertain as a whole.